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Preparing for Elections [Entrepreneur's Guide], by CHRIS ODONGO

Posted in Entrepreneurship

 

Preparing for Elections - Entrepreneurs Guide

 

It's exactly twenty days to election day in Kenya and as an entrepreneur and business owner, you have to plan for that day..... No scratch that you have to plan for the day before and the day after..... scratch that... you have to plan for two days before and three days after the election.

In my view, the eve of the election is possibly going to be very calm as campaigns will have ended over the weekend. Most companies will keep their doors closed on that day and you can expect your employees who vote up-country to have taken that day as a leave day and travelled the previous weekend to be ready to cast their vote on 8th August.

That said election day will come and go as people queue and exercise their democratic rights. The day after the election is bound to be too tense for anyone to venture outside and most of your employees will remain glued to the TV set watching results trickle in. 9th of August most MP's position will have been announced and perhaps the presidential results will be called in the evening with two possibilities; celebration or chaos. If it's celebration then you can expect no work to take place on 10th as well and so the entire week will be gone just like that.

The above being the case what should your plan as an entrepreneur look like?

Getting Back Control Over Your Business' Recurrent Expenditure, by ANN ICHUNGWA

Posted in Entrepreneurship

GETTING BACK

 

It is only too true that expenses tend to outstrip income at the start of a business venture and only too few, if any, new businesses are profitable as soon as they are launched. It takes time for a business venture to reach its break-even point and to start making a profit. Hence, keeping a tight control on working capital is essential for entrepreneurs who are focused on a long-term horizon, as a sustainable business can only be built on efficient working capital management systems.

 

Before diving deeper into the vast domain of working capital management, it is important to define precisely what constitutes working capital.

The Subtle Ways in which You May Be Undermining the Success of Your Business, by KIRIINYA KITHINJI

Posted in Entrepreneurship

Undermining Business Success

 

Like most Kenyans, I have been the unwilling recipient of harrowing service experiences in the hands of public officials. In fact, the service reputation of officers in government departments such as the various lands registries is well documented as nothing short of legendary, albeit in the wrong direction. Excellent service is the exception to the rule in many public offices.

The levels of customer service in some of the lands registries are so inadequate, that many clients believe that to get anything done, they need to "know somebody." That's just that the way life is, they reason.

In a sense, I can understand where such clients may be coming from. These long-suffering consumers of public services intuitively sense that they are up against the entrenched, mostly negative cultures that our public officers at the grassroots level are infamous for.

But I doubt that things were always that way.

Help! My Spouse's Business is Killing Us, by JORAM MWINAMO

Posted in Entrepreneurship

Help! My Spouse's Business is Killing Us

 

Dear Joram,


I got married 6 years ago to an entrepreneur and it all started as a great dream, I supported my spouse and we spent a lot of time talking about the business and its future plans. However, that dream has since turned into a nightmare. As I write this to you, I've reached the end of my ability to cope with what is going on. Let me explain.

We started the business modestly where we even converted one room in our house into a home office. We began our operations in a small way and within no time the business picked up quickly and began to make money! It all looked rosy and promising so we invested even more time and money into it. I took loans on the basis of my salary so that we could expand our operations and we even got a nice big office. That's when things began to go wrong. At some point , the growth of the business went out of control and we began to lose clients. Regulators also stepped in and things quickly went south, and we were left trying to pay up penalties of taxes we were not aware off. Before long the bank had sent auctioneers, and when we began to fall behind on mortgage payments. At this point the bank began to be quite hostile. Our car payments are behind and we have maxed out our credit cards. One of the cars we are paying for hasnt moved for months due to disrepair.

10 Mistakes Former Bluechip Employees Make As Entrepreneurs, by JORAM MWINAMO

Posted in Entrepreneurship

 10 Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make

 

This one might ruffle a few feathers.

 

Entrepreneurship is all the rage nowadays. I meet many employed executives, some who are very highly placed in C-Suite positions and they begin to tell me, excitedly, how they plan to start a business, jump out of corporate slavery and shake up a certain industry that they have their eyes on. I have become more and more cautious on the advice I give to such friends or acquaintances because after being an entrepreneur for close to 9 years full time after a brief employment stint, I've observed some mistakes and hard lessons that former corporate employees and particularly C-Suite executives make when they jump ship and begin to row their canoes. Here are the top 10: